Editors Note:


EDITOR'S NOTE: Fresh off a three year managerial stint, your friendly neighborhood lenslinger is back on the street and under heavy deadline. As the numbing effects of his self-imposed containment wear off, vexing reflections and pithy epistles are sure to follow...

Tuesday, January 22, 2008

Glass into Battle


Of all the little green army men I played with as a kid, I don't ever remember seeing a soldier-photog. Yet as the above photo shows, men with lenses have been trudging to the front since the birth of the captured image. In the 40's, members of the Army Signal Corps packed stills, film and heat through every theater of World War II. Whereas that should be more than enough to earn their way into molded plastic, the combat cameraman remains Missing In Action from your neighborhood toy store. It's my mission to change that, but before I can hurl something incendiary, I gotta get trained. Is there a definitive account of the combat cameraman? I'm sure I've just missed it on the History Channel and my VHS copy of Shooting War looks much too crusty to put in that old machine. I've yet to slog through all that I've found on-line but these sites look promising. Any others? C'mon, help a dogface out...

(ABOVE: Signal Corps combat cameramen Sgt. Carl Weinke, left, and PFC Ernest Marjoram wade through a stream while following infantry troops at Red Beach 2, Tanahmerah, New Guinea, during an Allied invasion, April 22, 1944.)

5 comments:

jim said...

If you have any research ability in you, what a documentary you could make out of this!

dustin. said...

It's unfortunate that the combat photogs in WW2 were instucted to avoid getting footage of African Americans in combat or otherwise if they could help it. Maybe that's why Clint thought there weren't any at IWO.

peter said...

why not go out to Iraq and follow Michael Yon around for a day or two?

'Widescreen' said...

I have blogged about this subject twice, not sure if you visit much but here are the links to what I found interesting subjects to post on.

Enjoy.

http://widescreen-btn.blogspot.com/2007/11/remembrance-day.html

AND ALSO....

http://widescreen-btn.blogspot.com/2007/04/wartime-cameramen-remembered.html

Austin said...

Well, there is always the ultra-true account played by Barry Pepper in "We Were Soldiers." Mel Gibson would never be in anything that were misleading, would he?